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Our Sacred Land
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The Sea Cat
The Sea Cat
3608 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 06, 2011, 13:55
Gwass wrote:
The Sea Cat wrote:
Squid Tempest wrote:


For hundreds (or even thousands) of years our population has been made up from people from various European countries, and many from further afield. There is nothing new here, and nothing wrong here. There should be no barriers between people in my opinion. Otherwise you perpetuate an "us and them" situation, which is inherently racist. Our country has always been, and hopefully always will be, multicultural and cosmopolitan. Population on our continent is mobile, and this needs to be accepted.



Absolutely. It is an organic and symbiotic process, hence our multi faceted and splendidly diverse culture and heritage.


I have to disagree. I remember reading a link on here about a year ago that research had proven that c85% of British people were directly related to the first settlers.

Isn't that "we're all immigrants anyway" a recent invention by the left to justify our mass immigration levels? I know a lot of people work in the public sector here and hence tory bashing is rife and these views go along with that. I know that working for local govt these pro immigration views are almost force fed to staff & that PC culture runs from top to bottom in such organisations, I talk from experience by the way.

Aren't these views just an example of that kind of conditioning if you like?

My understanding was also that historians incorrectly perpetuated the invasion theory untill recently due to ignorance and an obsession with the classical world being the only way to civilize us. I really thought that it was now accepted as being wrong that the Romans, Saxons, Viking & Normans all had much impact on us as a people apart from a cultural movement of ideas.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.


The broader cultural impact, not just numbers of settlers. Pre-Roman Britain from the Iron Age to the Celts was an important trader with many influences and mutual exchanges of cultures etc. This was surely compounded by the smaller number of immigrants who settled and whose influence was felt and assimilated, especially from Roman Britain, through the Middle Ages, Empire and beyond. From that viewpoint, we are most definitely a muli-culture.
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