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How is Rock Art aged?
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tiompan
tiompan
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Re: How is Rock Art aged?
Dec 17, 2012, 20:34
bladup wrote:
tiompan wrote:
bladup wrote:
thesweetcheat wrote:
Lots of these patterns (particularly spirals, zig zags and chevrons) appear in the edges of message pads when people doodle while on the phone/in meetings. I'm not sure that most of the people are taking hallucinogens at work (I could be wrong), so isn't an equally plausible explanation that these are the sort of patterns people make when decorating things?


and why do people decorate things?, the images seem deep rooted into the brain itself, people "tranced" out doodling do the same designs, people see the same designs with migraines, from fasting and meditation and when your trippin, which do you think they were doing at the great stone circles and chambered cairns??? do it at the sites and then you'll know yourself...


All the motifs found in passage grves and rock art are the same as found in the doodles of non drugged adults and children ,here is no need to infer meditaion , stress , deprivation ,drugs , any form of extrem asc , these motifs are the common inheritance of all humans . On the other hand look at the motifs drawn by people who are drugged ,regardless whether synthetic or organic , suffering from sleep depriavtion , hunger and they are cover a huge spectrum of motifs and are not limited to the relatively small number of motifs found in rock art .


Trip at the sites and they make a lot more sense, and when you do the gap between you and the ancients is almost non existent, they sometimes even stand with you.


You seem to forget this has been done many times , probably before you were born , great fun , but just as Bach sounds great whilst tripping we appreciate that he wasnt' when he wrote the stuff , although some people are still convinced he was .
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