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Where did folk live?
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tiompan
tiompan
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Re: Where did folk live?
May 10, 2017, 07:09
drewbhoy wrote:
tiompan wrote:
drewbhoy wrote:
tiompan wrote:
thesweetcheat wrote:
Presumably they could have built dwellings mainly from timber?


With the addition, in some cases , of turf and heather .
The LBK European longhouses were nearly all wooden .

Worth mentioning that some of the earlier British Neolithic buildings , although few and far between , sometimes had stone walls e.g. Skara Brae ,Knap of Howar and the later Dartmoor round houses could also have had stone walling .


Would 'wags' have anything to with this Mr T, probably they are later or would it be the Balbridie long house type thing??



Hi Drew
, Kempstone hill is a nightmare izzitno?

Yep Wags are later than the usual dates for hut circles.
Balbridie is just about as early as you get here and similar to the LBK longhouses , although the latter is even earlier .
Is there a connection ?
btw another "hall " similar to Balbridie was uncovered quite recently near Carnoustie


Kempstone Hill is brutal, certainly the cairn and first standing stone, the legs took a bit of a houking :-)

Balbridie and Carnoustie were the 2 that I thought about when you mentioned the LBKs. As for a connection, travelling tribes taking their ideas with them etc.

Further up from Ullapool and on the North Sea/Moray Firth coast there are lots of hut circle clusters. Would they have just gone to these remote places, obviously to build, but on days of special significance, stars etc. From the Minch and Moray coasts nowhere would be to far to travel, even on foot, up in Caithness/Sutherland so perhaps it was temporary lodgings they took with them.


It does look like that the hut circles were in use only for a short number of years then possibly re-used , a bit like extended period shieling use .

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