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tjj
tjj
3613 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 07:19
This has been a very interesting discussion and like any good debate - challenging at times. What no one has mentioned though is the burden that new developments places on our rivers, which I also consider to be sacred. The River Kennet for example always 'runs' dry near to its source in the summer - I've mentioned before that it used to service the new housing development on the southern edge of Swindon. I suppose we have accepted by now that the water that comes out of our taps has flushed a few toilets in it the past.

The time is not far away when water will become as expensive an utility as power - yet it always seems to be left out of the ecology argument of wind farms/solar heating, etc. Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.
moss
moss
2906 posts

Edited Sep 07, 2011, 09:31
Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 08:29
Well there has been an awful lot of discussion around on this subject of Our Sacred Land and I see John Vidal has also said something in the Guardian this morning.....
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/sep/06/national-trust-planning-reforms

about the National Trust's epetition launch against the planning reforms.
Not an organisation which you might see as predominantly prehistoric but at least it does a lot for protection of heritage...

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/
Sanctuary
Sanctuary
4676 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 08:43
tjj wrote:
This has been a very interesting discussion and like any good debate - challenging at times. What no one has mentioned though is the burden that new developments places on our rivers, which I also consider to be sacred. The River Kennet for example always 'runs' dry near to its source in the summer - I've mentioned before that it used to service the new housing development on the southern edge of Swindon. I suppose we have accepted by now that the water that comes out of our taps has flushed a few toilets in it the past.

The time is not far away when water will become as expensive an utility as power - yet it always seems to be left out of the ecology argument of wind farms/solar heating, etc. Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.

Nicely put June.
Squid Tempest
Squid Tempest
8787 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 09:00
Gwass wrote:
Squid Tempest wrote:
Gwass wrote:
In many cases the PC brainwashed point I made is absolutely the case. It's a fact I'm afraid, I mean you've only got to look at our state schools to see the left have taken over them, the average classroom has a large no of people verging on communism.

...

My views are perfectly reasonable and in the majority


I think you've just torpedoed your own argument there Gwass.



I meant staff rooms not class rooms & it's a fair point I think


I'd look out for those reds under your bed if I were you, they're the dangerous ones.
Squid Tempest
Squid Tempest
8787 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 09:40
Very thought provoking point.
Resonox
604 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 09:42
tjj wrote:
Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.


Would our ancestors not perhaps have used streams to wash away their own effluence??? So perhaps they would've been regarded as "sacred" as a cleanser as much as the other uses for water(already mentioned).
juamei
juamei
2011 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 10:24
The Sea Cat wrote:
Resonox wrote:
tjj wrote:
Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.


Would our ancestors not perhaps have used streams to wash away their own effluence??? So perhaps they would've been regarded as "sacred" as a cleanser as much as the other uses for water(already mentioned).


I think they would have differentiated between sacred wells/springs etc. and water sources for practical uses.


Unless they were considered sacred since they carried human waste away...
The Sea Cat
The Sea Cat
3608 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 10:59
Resonox wrote:
tjj wrote:
Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.


Would our ancestors not perhaps have used streams to wash away their own effluence??? So perhaps they would've been regarded as "sacred" as a cleanser as much as the other uses for water(already mentioned).


I think they would have differentiated between sacred wells/springs etc. and water sources for practical uses.
drewbhoy
drewbhoy
2519 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 11:23
The Sea Cat wrote:
juamei wrote:
The Sea Cat wrote:
Resonox wrote:
tjj wrote:
Not hard to see why clean, clear springs were held in such reverence by our ancestors.


Would our ancestors not perhaps have used streams to wash away their own effluence??? So perhaps they would've been regarded as "sacred" as a cleanser as much as the other uses for water(already mentioned).


I think they would have differentiated between sacred wells/springs etc. and water sources for practical uses.


Unless they were considered sacred since they carried human waste away...


The Celts saw water as the entrance to the Other World. Hence the Danube being named after the Celtic Goddess Danu, for example.


Don't know about down your way but a lot of sacred wells up here are close to cairns. Any connection or are both seemed useful to get to the next work. Thought this yesterday morning, St Colm's Well near Alvah Hill (home to 3 cairns) and St Devenick's near where a cairn once stood at Little Gight in the Ythan Valley.
drewbhoy
drewbhoy
2519 posts

Re: Our Sacred Land
Sep 07, 2011, 11:32
Cheers that looks a very restful and spiritual place, been to Glastonbury but never there. Another place to visit later this year.
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